S.T.E.M.

S.T.E.M.

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, or STEM, include academic, research, and outreach areas at Jarvis Christian College. STEM majors and minors include biology, chemistry, and mathematics, and there is also a minor in environmental science. Students interested in engineering can participate in a dual degree program, completing their basic studies at Jarvis and their later studies at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA). Upon graduation in engineering from UTA, these students also receive a degree from Jarvis. Several STEM faculty are involved in externally funded research activities. Research areas include studies of: 1) biodiversity of East Texas wetlands, 2) taxonomy and distribution of blood feeding insects, 3) water and environmental chemistry, 4) environmental microbiology, 5) cell membrane chemistry, 6) science education, and 7) mathematics education. Several STEM faculty members also devote time to other programs that support governmental and non-governmental programs at local, state, and national levels.

Jarvis Christian College has been successful in obtaining external grant funds to support STEM activities. Over the past decade, seven faculty members (5 in biology and 2 in chemistry) have been awarded a variety of research, equipment, and training grants. Agencies awarding these grants included the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the United Negro College Fund, Department of Energy, the Welch Foundation, and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

Current STEM related grants

The Science, Mathematics and Research Training (SMaRT) Grant is a second generation HBCU-UP (Historically Black College and Universities – Undergraduate Program) grant from the National Science Foundation. Funds from this grant have and are providing for the purchase of supplies, equipment, and improvements of selected classroom/research areas, but most of the funds are for scholarships and stipends and other support of qualified undergraduate students admitted to the undergraduate research program designed for this grant. The Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dr. Martin Yale is the Principal Investigator. The day to day management of this grant is provided by the Co-Principal Investigator, Dr. James Goodwin. The criteria for student participation on this grant, including the application, can be found by clicking on the following link (SMaRT Program). Information on SMaRT Grant activities are included in the section on STEM ACTIVITIES found below.

The ‘Nature Trail Grant’ is an award from the Texas Department of Parks and Wildlife. This grant provides funds to construct an approximately 2-mile long nature trail that will circle around and through the wetlands located on the northeast corner of College property. Construction of this trail was completed in March, 2011, and it was formally opened on March 25, 2011. Although not specifically a research and training grant, the Nature Trail will allow easier access to wetlands areas where there will be designated outdoor laboratory and research areas. This will greatly enhance and facilitate ongoing research and training in such areas as wetlands biodiversity, environmental chemistry, and wetlands microbiology. Even though the trail is open, work will continue for many months as the biodiversity of the area is studied by faculty, students, and visiting specialists. Dr.James Goodwin is the Principal Investigator for this grant.

Dr. Shakhawat Bhuiyan has been principal investigator or co-principal investigator on research grants for several years. His primary research addresses signal recognition particle (SRP), an important cytosolic ribonucleoprotein complex which directs secretory proteins to and across biological membranes in all organisms. Specifically, his research focuses on defining the interactions between the signal peptide and SRP RNA-bound SRP protein. This step is prerequisite for subsequent sequestering of many proteins including those which play a vital role in many human diseases, e.g. cardiovascular disease, stroke, and diabetes. He is a faculty investigator (Co-PI) in the UNIMET cluster grant sponsored by the United Negro College Funds Special Programs Corporation (UNCFSP) and NASA to carry out research on signal recognition particle with the participation of undergraduate students. He also is Principal Investigator of NSF sponsored research grant entitled “Cytosolic SULTs and environmental xenoestrogen metabolism: a Zebrafish model” that includes recruitment and training the undergraduate students in molecular cloning, enzyme kinetic assay, and polymerase chain reaction methods. Other research is focused on detection of microbial load at sites in the Jarvis wetlands, specifically coliform activity levels which are good indicators of fecal contamination of water. Student research, under his supervision will focus on molecular cloning, expression and reconstitution of SRP components, especially their interaction within the signal peptide and on microbiological quality of water at Jarvis wetlands and elsewhere in East Texas. More information can be obtained by contacting Dr. Shakhawat Bhuiyan

The Welch Foundation contributes to the advancement of chemistry through research grants, departmental programs, endowed chairs, Texas Interscholastic League Foundation scholarships, and other programs. The Jarvis Christian College Welch departmental grant supports chemical research by members of the chemistry department faculty, and also provides an opportunity for students to study chemistry in a less structured way. The grant is designed to provide students with the tools they need to gain and develop an interest in pursuing a career in chemistry. This funding ensures that students will have scholarships, lab equipment and chemicals and can travel to industry meetings and conferences. Applicants for the Welch Scholarships at Jarvis Christian College must major in chemistry and be willing to engage in chemical research. For more information concerning the Welch Scholarships please contact Dr. Glendora Carter the Project Director for this grant.

In addition to research being conducted by the faculty listed in the brief grant discussions above, there are opportunities for student participation in some of these grants. In most cases, participation includes scholarship and/or stipend support. Students desiring more information on the undergraduate research opportunities should click on the links noted in the discussion of the individual grant or contact the faculty member (Principal Investigator) of the grant.

Jarvis Christian College also hosts chapters of two national scientific honorary organizations, Beta Kappa Chi and Beta Beta Beta.

Beta Kappa Chi

The Jarvis Christian College Chapter of Beta Kappa Chi Scientific Honor Society was established in 1980. Beta Kappa Chi has the purpose of encouraging the advancement of scientific education through original investigations; the dissemination of scientific knowledge; and the stimulation of high scholarship in the pure and applied sciences.

Regular Membership

Undergraduate students are eligible for membership if they rank in the upper fifth of their class; have completed at least 64 semester hours of course work (with at least seventeen (17) semester hours in one of the sciences recognized by BKX ); a GPA of at least B in the science area; and, a general college average of at least “B”. Graduate students are eligible if they have completed at least fifteen (15) semester hours in one of the sciences recognized by the Society with a GPA of “A” in at least 1/3 of the hours and at least a “B” in the remaining 2/3 semester hours.

Dr. Glendora Carter and/or Ms. LaJuana Vaughn

Beta Beta Beta

The Delta Phi chapter of Beta Beta Beta (TriBeta) Biological Honor Society was established at Jarvis Christian College in 2007. The TriBeta is a society for students, particularly undergraduates, dedicated to improving the understanding and appreciation of biological study. It was founded in 1922 at Oklahoma City University has more than 520 chapters throughout the United States and Puerto Rico, and has evolved to become a nationally recognized professional honor society whose purposes are to promote scholarship in the biological sciences, growth in biological knowledge and to encourage research.

Regular Membership

3.0 cumulative G.P.A. and a minimum of 3 semesters of Biology, with a least a B average in Biology classes. Fee is $45 for a lifetime membership.

Associate Membership

open to anyone. Fee is $35. If you are currently an Associate, but have now met the requirements for Regular membership, an additional $10 will get you promoted to a Regular membership

Benefits of Tri-Beta Membership

Receive a subscription to BIOS (a journal where members can publish their undergraduate work); receive a cord to wear at graduation; can apply for research scholarships; can apply for awards based on research; be part of a national organization with students also interested in biology; you can also become a Tri-Beta officer.

To become a member contact Dr. Shakhawat Bhuiyan

STEM Activities

Meetings

  • The regular meetings of all SMaRT Grant students are held from 5:00-5:50 the first Thursday of each month during Fall and Spring Semesters. Members of both Beta Kappa Chi and Beta Beta Beta will be invited to meet concurrently.
  • The SMaRT students conducting research during the semester will arrange regular meetings with their Research Mentor. These meetings will not conflict with the above meeting or with other academic requirements.
  • ll first semester students will meet with Dr. Goodwin from 5:00-5:50 on the second Thursday of the semester and for 4-5 additional sessions during the first half of the semester. The schedule for the additional sessions will be established at the first meeting.

On-Going Student Research Updates

Current Research

  • Courtney McIntyre : Determination of Trace Metals concentration with the Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) instrumentation. Ms. McIntyre graduated in May, 2011, and she has applied for admission to graduate programs in chemistry. During the year she made oral presentations of her undergraduate research at Jarvis Christian College, Texas Southern University (Ronald McNair Undergraduate Research Conference), the University of Arkansas and at Beta Kappa Chi annual conference in New Orleans. At the Ronald McNair Undergraduate Research Conference she won the most coveted award of “research leadership award”.
  • Phylicia Rawls : Ms. Rawls graduated in May, 2011, and she has applied for admission to graduate programs in chemistry. She presented her research at Jarvis Christian College early in year 3. She is currently employed at a chemical research company in Longview, TX.
  • Cory Hamilton : Study of Signal Peptide Interaction within the Archaeal Signal – Mr. Hamilton is expected to graduate in May, 2012. He has completed his research and made poster presentations at Jarvis Christian College, the Emerging Researchers National Conference in Washington DC, the 66th Joint Meeting of the NIS and Beta Kappa Chi Scientific Honor Society at Norfolk State University VA, and the Beta Beta Beta Regional Conference at the Oklahoma Biological Station, Kingston, OK. He will also participate in a 10-week summer internship at George Washington University beginning May 31, 2011.Recognition Particle.
  • Jessica King : Ms. King is expected to Graduate May, 2012. She will be conducting her undergraduate research beginning in August, 2011, under the mentorship of Dr. Shakhawat Bhuiyan.
  • Deidre Huff : Ms. Huff is expected to graduate in May, 2012. Ms. Huff will participate in a 2011 NASA summer institute at Johnson Space Center beginning May 31, 2011.
  • Christen Myers : Mr. Myers is expected to complete his major in mathematics in December, 2011. He will give a presentation of his undergraduate work before the end of year 3.
  • Joshua Powell : Research area to be determined – Mr. Powell is expected to Graduate May, 2012. He is currently working to identify her research area.
  • Jasmine Jones : Research area to be determined – Ms. Jones is expected to Graduate May, 2012. She is currently working to identify her research area.
  • Recent Publications.
  • Manuscripts in preparation, under review, or accepted for publication.

Oral Presentations Made

  • Courtney McIntyre & Phylicia Rawls. “Determination of Trace Metals concentration with the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) instrumentation.” Courtney presented results of her part of the study at Texas Southern University, at University of Arkansas, and at Jarvis Christian College. Phylicia presented her part of the study at Jarvis Christian College.

Poster Presentations Done

  • Cory Hamilton*, Christian Zwieb, and Shakhawat Bhuiyan, “Study of Signal Peptide Interaction within the Archaeal Signal Recognition Particle” Emerging Researchers National (ERN) Conference in STEM in Washington, DC, on February 24-26, 2011,.
  • Cory Hamilton*, Christian Zwieb and Shakhawat Bhuiyan, “Study of Signal Peptide Interaction within the Archaeal Signal Recognition Particle”. 66th Joint Annual Meeting of the NIS and Beta Kappa Chi Scientific Honor Society, March 23-27, 2011. Norfolk State University, VA
  • Cory Hamilton*, Christian Zwieb, and Shakhawat Bhuiyan, “Study of Signal Peptide Interaction within the Archaeal Signal Recognition Particle” The Beta Beta Beta Regional Conference, April 1-3, 2011 at the University of Oklahoma Biological Station, Kingston, Oklahoma

On-Going Faculty Research Updates

Current Research : Select links to the following individual STEM faculty pages

Recent Publications

  • Goodwin, J. T. and Gibson, J.R. 2010. Survey of East Texas Sand Caves and Associated Fauna. Southeastern Naturallist. In Press.
  • Goodwin, J. T. 2010. New species of Cydistomyia Taylor with notes and collection records for other Tabanidae (Diptera) from New Guinea. Insecta Mundi 24:1-22.
  • Goodwin, J. T., W. Godwin, & L. Preston. 2010. Corrections and addenda to The Horse and Deer Flies (Diptera: Tabanidae) of Texas, including United States, Texas, and Texas County Records. Southwestern entomologist 35:147-55.
  • Zwieb, C. and Bhuiyan, S. 2010. Archaeal signal recognition particle shows the way. Archaea, Volume 2010, Article ID 485051; 1-11
  • Liu, T.-A.,Bhuiyan, S., Liu, M.-Y., Sugahara, T., Sakakibara, Y., Suiko, M., Yasuda, S., Kakuta, Y., Kimura, M., Williams, F.E., and Liu, M.-C. 2010. Zebrafish as a Model for the Study of the Phase II Cytosolic Sulfotransferases. Current Drug Metabolism 11, 538-546.
  • Yasuda, T., Yasuda, S., Williams, F. E., Liu,M-Y., Bhuiyan, S., Snow, R., Carter, G., & Liu, M.-C. 2011. Characterization and Ontogenic Study of Novel Steroid-sulfating SULT3 Sulfotransferases from Zebrafish. Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology, In press.

Manuscripts in preparation, under review, or accepted for Publication

  • Bhuiyan, S., H. Hamilton, C., and Zwieb, C. Accommodation of the signal peptide within the M-domain groove of Archaeoglobus fulgidus SRP54
  • W. Godwin & J. T. Goodwin. A Comparison of the Diversity and Seasonal Distributions of Tabanidae (Diptera) in two Northeast Texas Counties
  • Goodwin, J. T. Immature stages of some eastern Nearctic Tabanidae (Diptera). IX. Chrysops beameri Brennan and Hybomitra trispila (Wiedemann)
  • Goodwin, J. T. New species of Apatolestes Williston (Diptera, Tabanidae) from Texas and Nevada. New species of Apatolestes Williston (Diptera, Tabanidae) from Texas and Nevada

Recent Oral Presentations

  • Godwin, W. & J. R, Gibson. 2011. Fauna of East Texas Sand Caves. Presented at 2011 West Gulf Coastal Plains and Big Thicket Science Conference, 8-10 April, Nacogdoches, TX
  • Shakhawat Bhuiyan, 2010. Molecular Signal Peptide recognition and immune dysfunction in space environment. Presented at UNCF Special Programs Annual Research Trust Meeting, July 20-22, Sheraton National Hotel, Arlington, VA
  • Shakhawat Bhuiyan. 2010. MRI: Acquisition of a MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometer for Research and Education. Presented at NSF Major Research Instrumentation Proposal Development Workshop, November 12-13, Atlanta, GA.

Recent Poster Presentations

  • Curbow, K., J. R, Gibson, & W. Godwin. 2011. Fauna of East Texas Sand Caves.
  • Cory Hamilton, Christian Zwieb, and Shakhawat Bhuiyan, “Study of Signal Peptide Interaction within the Archaeal Signal Recognition Particle” Emerging Researchers National (ERN) Conference in STEM in Washington, DC, on February 24-26, 2011,
  • Cory Hamilton, Christian Zwieb and Shakhawat Bhuiyan, “Study of Signal Peptide Interaction within the Archaeal Signal Recognition Particle”. 66th Joint Annual Meeting of the NIS and Beta Kappa Chi Scientific Honor Society, March 23-27, 2011. Norfolk State University, VA
  • Cory Hamilton, Christian Zwieb, and Shakhawat Bhuiyan, “Study of Signal Peptide Interaction within the Archaeal Signal Recognition Particle” The Beta Beta Beta Regional Conference, April 1-3, 2011 at the University of Oklahoma Biological Station, Kingston, Oklahoma

Special Events

Other Presentations & Activities

  • Goodwin, J. T. January, 2011. Informal presentation to Hawkins/Holly Lake Rotary on status of the Jarvis Christian College Nature Trail.
  • The Goodwin Nature Trail at Jarvis Christian College was formally opened on March 25, 2011.
  • Guest Seminar on Woodpeckers and Insects, plus an evening ‘Owl Walk’ along the Nature Trail, April 12, 2011 (presenters Mr. Cliff Shackleford, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Ornithologist, and Dr. Will Godwin, Jarvis Assoc. Professor of Biology & Curator.
  • Drs. Godwin & Goodwin hosted visiting scientists from the Botanical Research Institute of Texas, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, the Texas Forest Service, the U. S. Forest Service, and the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, all of whom were studying the flora and fauna of East Texas.